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The USPS is Releasing a New Set of Batman Stamps

1:00 PM, Tuesday, September 30th, 2014 - Posted by John Wilson

Though the Dark Knight previously appeared on a set of stamps back in 2006, the US Postal Service have revealed (via USA Today) another set featuring the Caped Crusader to mark his 75th Anniversary. Consisting of five stamps, the series will showcase depictions of Batman from the Golden, Silver, Bronze and Modern ages.

"Batman is the most popular Superhero of all time, and it is an honor to have the U.S. Postal Service feature the Caped Crusader on this new set of stamps in celebration of his 75th anniversary," DC Entertainment co-publisher Jim Lee says. "Batman has inspired and influenced fans around the world for generations and will continue to do so for the next 75 years and beyond."

"He is the quintessential American superhero," says Susan McGowan, the Postal Service's director of stamp services and corporate licensing. "What a great place to celebrate him — on a stamp. We are always looking for ideas and subjects that are important to America. We all quickly thought, ';Wow! This will be thrilling.'"

The first sets of the stamps will be sold at this year's New York Comic Con and will be available nationwide afterward.

Source: Superhero Hype

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Sllabus Notes from an Accidental Professor

8:00 PM, Sunday, September 21st, 2014 - Posted by John Wilson

Drawn & Quarterly will publish Lynda Barry's Syllabus: Notes from an Accidental Professor.

The book is based on the veteran cartoonist's long-running writing workshop, 'Writing the Unthinkable'.

"Syllabus: Notes from an Accidental Professor is the first book to make her innovative lesson plans and writing exercises available to the public for home or classroom use," said D&Q.

"Barry teaches a method of writing that focuses on the relationship between the hand, the brain, and spontaneous images, both written and visual.

"It has been embraced by people across North America - prison inmates, postal workers, university students, high-school teachers, and hairdressers - for opening pathways to creativity.

"Syllabus takes the course plan for Barry's workshop and runs wild with it in her densely detailed signature style.

"Collaged texts, ballpoint-pen doodles, and watercolor washes adorn Syllabus's yellow lined pages, which offer advice on finding a creative voice and using memories to inspire the writing process."

Syllabus will receive a general release on October 21. It debuted at SPX earlier this month.

Source: Digital Spy

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Superman/Wonder Woman Futures End #1

1:00 PM, Sunday, September 21st, 2014 - Posted by John Wilson

SPOILER ALERT: If you have not read SUPERMAN/WONDER WOMAN: FUTURES END #1 yet and do not wish to know what happens, stop reading this post now (major spoilers ahead!).

Five years from now, in WONDER WOMAN: FUTURES END #1, we find the Amazon Princess embracing her "God of War" persona as she is entrenched in an epic battle with the evil Nemesis.

Or so we may think...

Bracing for a deadly blood fest, the opening pages of SUPERMAN/WONDER WOMAN: FUTURES END #1 reveal that Wonder Woman has actually been infected by Nemesis and has been imagining the entire battle in her head!

Coming to terms with reality, Wonder Woman finds one truth in her delusions: Nemesis is still the enemy.

Witnessing the devastation around her, Wonder Woman realizes that there's only one last hope to stop Nemesis, and it's not war... it's peace!

With Nemesis' army closing in on her, see below as Wonder Woman embraces the fallen spirit of Eirene and transforms into the "God of Peace!"

How will peace defeat Nemesis' army? Is her new persona permanent? Sound off in the comments below!

SUPERMAN/WONDER WOMAN: FUTURES END #1, written by Charles Soule, and illustrated by Rags Morales, Jose Marzan & Batt, is available in stores now.

Source: DC Comics Blog

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The Steve Rude Documentary will be Available in October

3:00 PM, Wednesday, September 17th, 2014 - Posted by John Wilson

Ian Fischer's Steve Rude documentary will be released in October.

Rude Dude will be available on DVD and VOD on October 7.

The film has been screened at various conventions over 2014.

Rude Dude documents the creator's career and his move into fine arts, as well as his struggles with mental illness.

The 91-minute documentary includes interviews with Mike Baron, Paul Gulacy, Mike Richardson, Alex Ross and Mike Allred.

The DVD release includes two commentary tracks - one from Fischer and composer Ross Williams, the other from Rude's Nexus co-creator Baron.

Source: Digital Spy

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Graphic Canon with a Children's Literature

9:00 AM, Wednesday, September 3rd, 2014 - Posted by John Wilson

Russ Kick will return to The Graphic Canon with a Children's Literature volume.

The editor will release a fourth, supplementary volume of the anthology series from Seven Stories Press.

The original three Graphic Canon books tell the history of literature from Gilgamesh to the present day.

The new book - which spotlights some of the greatest moments in children's literature - features contributions from Isabel Greenberg, Roberta Gregory, Rick Geary, Dame Darcy and Noah Van Sciver.

The books feature original and reprinted material. Previous contributors include Robert Crumb, Will Eisner, S Clay Wilson and Hunt Emerson.

The Graphic Canon of Children's Literature will be released on November 4.

Source: Digital Spy

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Could SDCC be Moving out of San Diego?

1:00 PM, Tuesday, September 2nd, 2014 - Posted by John Wilson

The future of San Diego Comic-Con is slightly more uncertain following the San Diego City Council's decision Tuesday not to appeal a court ruling that would end plans to expand the city's convention center — plans that were a primary motivator in Comic-Con organizers extending their previous agreement with the city.

The ruling, passed down from the Fourth District Court of Appeal earlier this month, struck down a proposed levy on hotels in the area around the San Diego Convention Center — a levy which was relied upon to foot much of the projected $520 million cost of the planned expansion for the Convention Center. On Tuesday, the San Diego City Council decided not to appeal the ruling, leaving the future of the expansion project in doubt.

"We're going to have to spend some time figuring out a way to pay for this project or find a new one," council president Todd Gloria told local news station CBS 8. Construction on the expansion was originally scheduled to begin in "late 2014," according to authorities.

The expansion of the convention center space was seen by many to be a factor in Comic-Con International extending its agreement with the city through 2016, despite competition from both Los Angeles and Anaheim. But in a statement to THR, Comic-Con International's David Glanzer explained that "any decision to remain in San Diego has always been based on a variety of issues, including hotel room rates, available meeting space and other concerns, none of which necessarily override the other."

Glanzer added that the organization is "grateful that the mayor, city officials, hoteliers and convention center staff have worked to help mitigate our space concerns and are happy that we have a continuous dialogue with those entities. We hope there will be a solution that allows Comic-Con to stay in San Diego for years to come."

The annual five-day event is estimated to bring in around $180 million to the city each year.

Whether or not Comic-Con would actually leave the city is unclear, especially given that the convention center's expansion is not definitely dead. Many industry insiders, including writer and Comic-Con regular Mark Evanier, think the event's move is highly unlikely if not outright impossible, given its history with the city. It is worth pointing out, however, that WonderCon, another annual Comic-Con International event which ran in California's Bay Area since its 1987 inception, moved to Anaheim in 2012 and has shown little sign of moving back.

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World's Finest Presents a New Power Girl?

9:00 AM, Monday, August 25th, 2014 - Posted by John Wilson

SPOILER ALERT: If you have not read WORLD'S FINEST #26 yet and do not wish to know what happens, stop reading this post now (major spoilers ahead!).

The boom tube worked! After five years of being stranded on Earth Prime, young scientist Tanya Spears was able to send Karen Starr and Helena Wayne back home to Earth 2...At least that's where she hopes she sent them. . . .

Having been knocked unconscious by the boom tube power surge, Tanya groggily awakens to a mystery of her own. Besides not knowing the whereabouts of those who entered the portal, she's shocked to learn she has an unusual amount of physical strength. For instance, Tanya, trapped under a heavy piece of metal, is able to lift the large debris without any effort at all. . . . All by herself!

How and why does she have this incredible power? And where did her abs of steel and chiseled biceps come from?

The answer to these questions might be just as perplexing. On her quest for information, an attorney approaches Tanya and reveals that Karen Starr has left her the name "Power Girl!"

Now that's a lot to take in!

Is this the gift Karen alluded to before entering the portal? Below, take a look as Tanya learns for the first time the legacy she is entrusted to inherit from Karen Starr. What does this mean for Tanya's future?!

WORLD'S FINEST #26, written by Paul Levitz and illustrated by Tyler Kirkham and Scott Kolins, is available in stores now.

SOurce: DC Comics

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Mark Waid has a Record Breaking Room

9:00 AM, Saturday, August 23rd, 2014 - Posted by John Wilson

Mark Waid has marked a Daredevil record with his run.

The writer has noted on Twitter that his acclaimed run on the Marvel Comics series marks the longest unbroken run on it by any creator.

Waid began his ongoing run on Daredevil in 2011, introducing a new, more upbeat direction for the traditionally dark, noir-influenced title.

The title relaunched with a new #1 earlier in 2014, with Waid and his collaborator Chris Samnee continuing on the comic with a new storyline.

Frank Miller's legendary '80s run on Daredevil established the formerly dark tone of the comic.

Waid's most recent issue, Daredevil #7, was released August 20th.

Source: Digital Spy

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DC All Access for August 5th: Gotham, Flash, and more!

8:00 PM, Tuesday, August 5th, 2014 - Posted by Brant Fowler

On today's episode of DC ALL ACCESS, Tiffany Smith and Blair Herter show a clip from upcoming FOX show GOTHAM, talk with the director of CREATURE COMMANDOS, interview a cast member of THE FLASH, talk FBP: FEDERAL BUREAU OF PHYSICS, and more. You can watch the episode here and read the full official description below.

Today's episode of "DC All Access" is live and is full of fan-favorite news and interviews from the world of DC Entertainment, and I wanted to send it along in case you'd like to share with your readers!

In today's all new episode of DC All Access, host Tiffany Smith talks to Dave Mendel, the imaginative director of CREATURE COMMADOS, about the new shorts airing on Cartoon Network. Viewers are also given a glimpse of GOTHAM on FOX, Tiffany also talks to actor John Wesley Shipp about what it's like to return to the world of THE FLASH (after playing the titular hero in the earlier 90s-era TV show). Lastly, Blair Herter learns what's ahead in the scientifically savvy FBP: FEDERAL BUREAU OF PHYSICS from writer Simon Oliver.

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Harrassment at Comic Con

11:45 AM, Sunday, July 27th, 2014 - Posted by John Wilson

The following is an article that recently addressed the growing harassment against, but not limited to, women at San Diego Comic Con. This subject is currently very hotly debated and is, as such, controversial. While the Comic Related staff is vehemently against harassment of all types, we do not include this article as a representation of an opinion, but simply for informational purposes. Your mileage may vary. Regardless of personal opinions, this is an interesting article that everyone should read.
John Wilson Reporting for Comic Related

Comic-Con 2014: Outcry, Action Against Harassment Grows

Mariah Whether attended her first Comic-Con as a newly minted comic book editor a few years ago, looking to network with artists. But at a nighttime party in a hotel by the bay, she realized that others had a different kind of connection in mind.

"One of the guys suddenly had his hand on my butt," said Huehner, 35, who is best known as the author of the "True Blood" and "Emily and the Strangers" comics. "It's a shocking reminder that you're seen differently."

Comic-Con International's dense crowds, Bacchanalian atmosphere and mask-wearing anonymity make it prime territory for misbehavior, according to both men and women who have attended the event many times. Here, and at other similar events around the country, convention-goers have been known to grope, stalk and take "upskirt" photos with impunity. The behavior is so common that there is even a term for it: Creeping at a con.

But as San Diego's annual convention opens Thursday, a backlash is brewing. One prominent science fiction author is holding his event away from the official Convention Center site to protest what he calls lax anti-harassment policies. And a group calling itself Geeks for CONsent submitted a petition with 2,500 signatures calling on organizers to post signs in the convention halls detailing its anti-harassment policies. It also wants convention volunteers to get training on how to respond to harassment reports.

"San Diego Comic-Con is the mecca of conventions," said Rochelle Keyhan of Geeks for CONsent, who plans to hand out literature about what constitutes harassment while dressed as a steampunk Disney princess. "They should be leading by example. Instead they think they're the only convention that has no harassment."

Organizers point out that Comic-Con already posts its policy, that "harassing or offensive behavior will not be tolerated," on its website and in a printed events guide.

"Anyone being made to feel uncomfortable at our show is obviously a concern for us," Comic-Con spokesman David Glanzer said in an email. "The safety of our attendees is a primary concern of ours. For this reason we have more staff and security than other events of our type. In addition we also have a command post in the lobby of our event that is staffed with members of the San Diego Police Department, fire and other emergency services."

With about 130,000 attendees, Comic-Con is a place where fans celebrate superheroes and science fiction and Hollywood studios promote their upcoming geek-friendly fare. As comic book characters have broadened, so too has their fan base. More women have begun attending Comic-Con in recent years, and now comprise about 40% of convention-goers, according to Glanzer.

Women who attend these conventions say some of the men present still seem to think it's a boys club.

Janelle Asselin, who has edited comics for DC and Disney, said she has been groped at half a dozen conventions. She said a male comic book artist once told her he would like to eat her "like a pie," and she received rape threats in comments posted online after she had written a critique of a comic on her blog.

"It seems worse in the last five years or so," Asselin said. "But I think a big part of that is that there are more women here, and more women saying, ';I'm not gonna shut up about how women are treated in comics or how they're treated at cons.'"

The uncomfortable moments aren't limited to after-parties and encounters on the crowded convention floor. At a "Game of Thrones" panel at the 2011 San Diego Comic-Con, a mix of cheers and groans rose up in the audience when actor Jason Momoa said his favorite part of his role on the HBO show is that he gets to "rape beautiful women and have them fall in love with me." At a panel last year featuring female action stars called "Women Who Kick Ass," audience members waiting for other speakers grew restless and complained audibly in the convention hall that the panel should be called "Women Who Talk too Much."

The atmosphere persists at conventions even as the comics world itself is becoming more inclusive. In the last week, Marvel Comics introduced a female Thor and a black Captain America, and a new "Archie" comic saw its red-headed hero take a bullet for an openly gay character.

There are signs Comic-Con is heeding some of the criticism a last-minute email sent to badge-holders late Tuesday prominently highlighted its anti-harassment policy, and encouraged attendees to enlist security if they feel unsafe. Glanzer said it was the first time organizers had taken that step, saying "it seemed like a good idea to add to that with the email distribution."

For some would-be attendees, including sci-fi author John Scalzi, organizers haven't done enough. Last summer, Scalzi wrote a blog post titled "My New Convention Harassment Policy," saying he would only be a panelist or guest of honor at a convention that has a clear, visible and enforced harassment policy. More than 1,100 people, including several other authors, co-signed his post.

"Every section of culture and society goes through this, where a group who has put up with a lot of harassment says, ';No, we don't want that anymore,'" Scalzi said recently. "There's always that moment where the world shifts. Nerd culture is in the middle of that now."

Though Scalzi's publisher, Tor Books, had already booked him to attend Comic-Con this year, he decided to hold his event, a reading and signing, at a location outside the convention center.

"I found Comic-Con's policy to be deficient," Scalzi said. "It didn't state clearly and unambiguously what they believe harassment to be."

The culture of caddishness at fan and genre conventions is a long one in a piece of correspondence from a 1962 science fiction convention in Chicago, an organizer suggested that writer Isaac Asimov deliver a talk on the "Positive Power of Posterior Pinching" and offered to supply some posteriors. Asimov declined, but asked to be pointed to a "girlie show" while in town.

In 2006, while accepting a Hugo Award at a convention in Anaheim, author Harlan Ellison grabbed the breast of the presenter, author Connie Willis. In the world of science fiction literature, it was the equivalent of the lead actor winner grabbing the lead actress winner's breast at the Oscars.

"It was a slap in the face to me to see a successful, powerful and respected writer treated that way at the genre's biggest award ceremony," said science fiction author Kameron Hurley, who was sitting in the audience. "I didn't go to many cons for a few years after that."

Changing a culture where even minor tweaks to a character's suit can be treated as blasphemy will be slow going, many in the genre world say.

"We have a saying, ';If something's done once, it's a tradition. If something's done twice, it's a hallowed tradition,'" Scalzi said. "Not everything is gonna be solved immediately, but when people are becoming much more willing to publicly say, ';This is a problem. This guy has done this thing and we want it addressed,' I do think change is coming."

Source: Rebecca Keegan/Hero Complex

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