IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Where do you stand on ereaders?, tech survey
CEMartin2
post Dec 7 2012, 11:44 AM
Post #1


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 38
Joined: 6-July 12
From: Indiana
Member No.: 20,420



And I don't mean which corner...

Seriously, do pulp readers like ereaders? When i was a kid, I loved collecting my comics. Possessing them and looking at them over and over was grand. By my teens, visions of ereaders filled my head- maybe it was due to the movie BIG or something. But in any event, I thought that digital reading would be super cool.

It seems today that isn't the case. It's been estimated 75% of ereader users are women. Where are all the guys? Do we still lust after paper printings we can display on the shelves like proud collecting trophies? I have to admit I like both worlds. A paperback is great to have, but being able to carry hundreds of books on my phone or tablet, even though I don't read them at once, or maybe ever, is very attractive.

Where do you stand? Physical copy or ebook?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mat Nastos
post Dec 7 2012, 11:53 AM
Post #2


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 89
Joined: 22-November 10
Member No.: 19,653



QUOTE (CEMartin2 @ Dec 7 2012, 09:44 AM) *
Where do you stand? Physical copy or ebook?


For fiction, I prefer ereaders at this point. I've got way too many books and having all my books on my nook makes things a lot easier. Makes my wife happier, too! For the 'new pulp' stuff, I've never bought a print copy of a book or anthology. The prices tend to be a bit high in print, so e-format makes more sense.

So there you go - less clutter and cheaper prices make ereaders an e-z choice biggrin.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Derrick
post Dec 14 2012, 07:11 PM
Post #3


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 99
Joined: 18-October 08
From: Brooklyn, NY
Member No.: 2,804



I don't understand why it has to be an either/or thing. I enjoy reading paperbacks and hardcovers and I enjoy reading books on my Kindle.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mat Nastos
post Dec 15 2012, 09:19 PM
Post #4


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 89
Joined: 22-November 10
Member No.: 19,653



QUOTE (Derrick @ Dec 14 2012, 05:11 PM) *
I don't understand why it has to be an either/or thing. I enjoy reading paperbacks and hardcovers and I enjoy reading books on my Kindle.


I don't think his question was either/or. He was just wondering what people thought of ereaders. For me, most of my reading is done on ereader for the sake of space nowadays. If it's a story/novel I want to keep, it generally goes on the ereader. If it isn't something I want long-term, I hit the library (either physical or Overdrive). The only physical books I buy any more tend to be big hardcover artbooks or collections.

It's all about space, tho. If I had endless space, I love physical books.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
cougar18
post Dec 16 2012, 09:07 PM
Post #5


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 572
Joined: 27-June 11
From: IRELAND
Member No.: 19,981



QUOTE (Mat Nastos @ Dec 15 2012, 10:19 PM) *
I don't think his question was either/or. He was just wondering what people thought of ereaders. For me, most of my reading is done on ereader for the sake of space nowadays. If it's a story/novel I want to keep, it generally goes on the ereader. If it isn't something I want long-term, I hit the library (either physical or Overdrive). The only physical books I buy any more tend to be big hardcover artbooks or collections.

It's all about space, tho. If I had endless space, I love physical books.


Me, I prefer the physical novel, when I can. But that depends on the material too. Whether it is a laptop or a portable console, I generally prefer to do my reading in the physical realm. But I do purchase books and other materials in physical copy, mainly because I want to absorb the knowledge within them.

I think space is the major issue also. Books like How to draw or how to paint I prefer to have digital copies of, mainly because I can just flick them out when I want, and don't need to worry about dust or anything like that.
But books that I love, and want to re-read again and again...I'll take the physical, paper copy. I'm like that, I guess.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
AaronSmith
post Dec 18 2012, 08:16 AM
Post #6


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 487
Joined: 24-November 08
From: New Jersey
Member No.: 2,836



I personally don't own an e-reader and have no plans to buy one soon. I prefer paper and being able to hold a real book as I read it. Also, if I want to read I want to be able to put myself in a place where it's just me and that book, without the options of switching books or having other things available to do. It's the same as how I don't like to watch movies on my computer: too many potential distractions.

But I don't think e-readers are a bad thing. If some people like them, it's great. And it's another way for me to sell more books.

Still, it is weird that one of my novels is only available as an e-book. I kind of miss having it on the shelf where I keep a copy of all my other published works.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
MasonEasley
post Dec 18 2012, 04:46 PM
Post #7


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 517
Joined: 4-June 09
Member No.: 15,679



Frankly, its the future of print media. Its way too convenient and affordable to not be. I'm already seeing kids and teenagers pile their books into Ipads and Kindles. College kids are dumping their textbooks onto tablets and laptops. In Japan, most manga now is sold digitally. You just can't beat it in terms of storage and portability. Think about it, instead of having to thumb through boxes to get to that issue of X-Men you want to read, you just type it in and it pops up.

Its only a matter of time at this point. Print media will still be around of course, but don't be surprised if 85-90% of books are purchased digitally by 2020.

This post has been edited by MasonEasley: Dec 18 2012, 04:49 PM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
cougar18
post Dec 18 2012, 06:27 PM
Post #8


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 572
Joined: 27-June 11
From: IRELAND
Member No.: 19,981



QUOTE (MasonEasley @ Dec 18 2012, 04:46 PM) *
Frankly, its the future of print media. Its way too convenient and affordable to not be. I'm already seeing kids and teenagers pile their books into Ipads and Kindles. College kids are dumping their textbooks onto tablets and laptops. In Japan, most manga now is sold digitally. You just can't beat it in terms of storage and portability. Think about it, instead of having to thumb through boxes to get to that issue of X-Men you want to read, you just type it in and it pops up.

Its only a matter of time at this point. Print media will still be around of course, but don't be surprised if 85-90% of books are purchased digitally by 2020.


I think it will be like the LP-Cassette-CD-Mp3. Alot of people buy CD's and Mp3's, but the small minority buy the LP's still. I used to think it was those who grew up in the heyday of the LP, but I have known people who are much younger than that, and keep a keen collection of LP's. The reason being, especially with bands such as the Rolling Stones, Beach Boys, or The Beatles, is that they feel that they are hearing the music the way it was meant to be heard. Other's say that there is something special about the old LP, vs CD/ Mp3, rather than a sound quality difference, even if the CD may be better.

Again, the same thing will happen with books. Now, obviously, if you want to get a signed copy of a book, it is going to be unbelievably difficult with a digital copy. laugh.gif

I personally have a load of books on my hard drive/ laptop. But I also purchase a ton of paperback books, or a few hardbacks, since I don't own a nook or kindle, mainly because I just prefer holding a book. And any form of ereader is just too expensive for me at the moment.

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mat Nastos
post Dec 18 2012, 08:03 PM
Post #9


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 89
Joined: 22-November 10
Member No.: 19,653



QUOTE (cougar18 @ Dec 18 2012, 04:27 PM) *
Again, the same thing will happen with books. Now, obviously, if you want to get a signed copy of a book, it is going to be unbelievably difficult with a digital copy. laugh.gif


Authorgraph.com makes getting digital signed to you specifically pretty easy biggrin.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
cougar18
post Dec 18 2012, 10:03 PM
Post #10


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 572
Joined: 27-June 11
From: IRELAND
Member No.: 19,981



QUOTE (Mat Nastos @ Dec 18 2012, 08:03 PM) *
Authorgraph.com makes getting digital signed to you specifically pretty easy biggrin.gif


Yeah, but I was thinking more along the lines of the marker along the page, with dedication. Plus you get to meet the artist/ writer too.

Or at least you should do.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mat Nastos
post Dec 19 2012, 10:10 AM
Post #11


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 89
Joined: 22-November 10
Member No.: 19,653



QUOTE (cougar18 @ Dec 18 2012, 08:03 PM) *
Yeah, but I was thinking more along the lines of the marker along the page, with dedication. Plus you get to meet the artist/ writer too.

Or at least you should do.


Authorgraph lets the author personalize each signature with a dedication. It's pretty cool and seems pretty popular. I've been getting asked for a lot of digital signatures at my Disney appearances now. One isn't a replacement for the other, just something new and exciting for fans to get excited by.



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
CEMartin2
post Dec 19 2012, 11:49 AM
Post #12


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 38
Joined: 6-July 12
From: Indiana
Member No.: 20,420



QUOTE (Mat Nastos @ Dec 19 2012, 11:10 AM) *
Authorgraph lets the author personalize each signature with a dedication. It's pretty cool and seems pretty popular. I've been getting asked for a lot of digital signatures at my Disney appearances now. One isn't a replacement for the other, just something new and exciting for fans to get excited by.



If I ever get to the point someone actually wants my autograph, I think I'd just have some prints of book covers for them, the same way a lot of the movie folks do at conventions. I just don't get the 'digital autograph" thing.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mike Bullock
post Jan 28 2013, 05:36 AM
Post #13


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 67
Joined: 5-January 09
Member No.: 2,876



I love the idea of my Kindle, but prefer to hold a physical book. Just another old fart stuck in my ways...


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
GrantGardiner
post Jan 29 2013, 01:31 AM
Post #14


Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 12
Joined: 8-May 12
Member No.: 20,366



Kinda feel out of place now. I'm all e-reader, all the time now. It's just so cheap and easy, especially when you have wireless access. I can be thinking about a classic book reference I read long ago, log in, download it and read. Great for researching free classics when you're in a coffee shop or something.

And did I mention cheap? I can actually afford to read as much stuff as I have time for. E-pulp is just too convenient and cheap for me to go back.

Collectability would be the only reason I would have to buy a hard copy, and I'd want that to be an 'artefact' ie a collectors edition of sorts. Something artsy that celebrates my love of that book with everyone else who shares my love of the story, just like DVD collectable sets. Beyond that I'm all on board the e-reader train.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 

RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 21st November 2014 - 06:02 AM